Frequently Asked Questions

Admissions (23)

Visit the Admissions page to apply to BYU–Hawaii.

Visit the Financial Aid website for deadlines regarding financial aid. Visit the Academics website for registration deadlines. 

BYU-Hawaii offers majors in 25 fields. Please visit the catalog to see a list of all our major fields of study.

  • All application materials must be received by the CES Admissions Office on or before the deadline for the semester or term for which the applicant is seeking admission. Applicants who submit any portion of their application after the deadline for the semester/term for which they are applying may be considered for the next available semester/term. Click here to view the academic dates to remember. 
  • All of the following factors are very important to the application process:

    • Your church interview with your bishop and stake president (Part 3); you must be completely active and "endorsed" by your Church leaders
    • Seminary and/or institute attendance (Part 4)
    • A “B” average or higher high school grade point average (GPA, US system) 
    • Your Church service; extra consideration given to returned missionaries
    • Your essay (Part 7); this is not an English test, but rather a chance to share more about yourself and why you want to attend BYU–Hawaii
    • Your financial situation (Part 8); you need to be able to show that you have enough money to study at BYU–Hawaii or that you are eligible for scholarships
    • ACT score of 21 minimum and 25+ to be competitive / SAT score of 1130 or higher

    Remember that ALL college and university transcripts need to be official.  Faxed copies will not be accepted.

    • 61 on the IBT TOEFL (500 on the paper test)
    • 5.5 on IELTS
    • 75+ on the Michigan

    You should check your status regularly online by going to the status page on Besmart.com. Normally, a student should receive a decision 30-60 days after application deadline. IWORK students can expect to wait an additional month or two after sending in all the required documents. 

    Visit the Admissions site for a list of tasks that must be completed before registering.

    This information can be obtained on the Financial Aid website.
    • The university provides a shuttle service to and from the Honolulu International Airport at set times each semester.
    • The shuttle is limited to new or returning students only. Family members will need to find transportation on their own.
    • You can make phone reservations by calling (808) 675-3404/675-3489, Monday-Friday 7am-5pm Pacific Time.
    • Students may pay a fee beforehand or may have the fee added to their student accounts payable after arrival on campus.
    • Many BYU–Hawaii students go on for higher degrees at prestigious schools such as Columbia, MIT, Harvard, Vanderbilt, Purdue, Oxford University, BYU Provo, and other first-rate universities. 
    • Career Services currently has several initiatives to connect students with employment in their home country/region and field of study. They are also actively helping students prepare for, identify, and apply for internship and employment opportunities.
    • Many students complete internships where they are able to develop skills, gain experience, and make connections for post-graduate work opportunities.
    • Visit the Career Services website for more information.
    • No. Because the Church heavily subsidizes the university and because we can admit only a small percentage of the students who apply, university and Church policy is that we can admit no student for a second degree.
    • We recommend students who desire to further their studies at a Church school to apply to the Graduate programs at BYU in Provo.

    All students are required to graduate in nine semesters with a minimum of 120 semester hours of credit.  Student with transfer credits are expected to graduate within a shorter time period. Taking classes equivalent to a double major or minor can be done if they are completed within your allotment of semesters in residence.

    • BYU–Hawaii is consistently ranked 2nd for Baccalaureate institutions with the most international students in the Open Doors Report on International Educational Exchange by the Institute of International Education.
    • Several of our unique majors including Hawaiian Studies, Pacific Island Studies, International Cultural Studies, TESOL, Hospitality and Tourism Management are among the best of their kind in the US.
    • Many of our athletic teams are also consistently nationally ranked.
    • BYU–Hawaii students abide by the Honor Code. This code includes:
      • Dress and grooming standards (modest clothing and hairstyles).
      • No alcohol, drugs, tobacco, coffee or tea.
      • No premarital or extra-marital sexual relations.
      • No cheating or plagiarizing.
      • Students also attend church meetings each Sunday.
      • Religion classes are required for graduation.
      • Devotional meetings for all students are held weekly campus and all campus offices and services are closed during this time.
    • No. However, because members of the Church support the church through their donations, LDS (Mormon) students pay a lower tuition cost than do non-members.
    • Approximately 3% of our total enrollment is made up of non-LDS students.
    • Members will have attended seminary or institute and who have served as missionaries for the Church will also be given extra consideration for admissions.
    • Although you are not required to be a member, we expect all BYU–Hawaii students to reflect the standards of the Church in their daily lives.
    • After you are admitted to BYU–Hawaii, we will send you either an I-20 (for non-sponsored students) or a DS-2019 (for sponsored students) which you will need to get a Visa from the US Embassy or Consulate. Students should read the back of the DS-2019 carefully for provisions and restrictions that accompany the visa. 
    • You will also need to pay a $180-$200 SEVIS fee at least 3 days before your interview at the Embassy. You can pay online and download your receipt to take with you to the Embassy.
    • The Embassy officer will interview you to see if you will receive a visa or not. You must also take your financial documents to show that you have enough money or that you have a scholarship to pay for your schooling.
    • You can arrive in the US up to 30 days before your classes start (if you have a place to live), but you cannot arrive after the date written on the I-20 or DS-2019. Please be careful about these dates.

     

    Visit BYU Provo’s site for information regarding CES Net IDs and passwords. 

    Once you have your CES Net ID it will not be available for use on the BYU–Hawaii computer systems until the next day.

    After that, if you cannot use your CES Net ID to login to my.byuh.edu please contact the BYU–Hawaii helpdesk at (808)675-3211.

     

    Visit the online catalog for more information about FERPA guidelines. 

    Go to my.byuh.edu and sign in with your CES Net ID. Click on the “Student” tab and then on “Student Center.” From here, you can update your name, address, phone number, email address, and emergency contacts.

     

    Your BYUH ID is the seven digit number you are assigned when you are accepted as a student and is the number printed on your ID card. This number is also issued to all employees and dependents of employees and students.

    Your CES Net ID was created when you first applied to the university. It is used to log into my.byuh.edu, e-mail, my.drive, etc.

     

    BYU–Hawaii is located in Laie, Hawaii. Laie (population 7,000) is situated 35 miles north of Honolulu on the island of Oahu. The 100-acre campus is nestled between lush mountains and ideal shoreline. The average annual temperature is 77 degrees F (25 C); the average annual precipitation is 23 inches (584 mm).

    David O. McKay, ninth president of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, broke ground for the university on February 12, 1955. Classes in the new Church College of Hawaii started on September 26 of that same year.

    President David O. McKay is the founder of BYU–Hawaii. While an apostle in 1921, he visited the Church-operated elementary school in Laie and envisioned that a university would someday be built in the community. Thirty-four years later, he saw the fulfillment of that vision when he presided over the groundbreaking ceremony for the campus.

    BYU–Hawaii is sponsored by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. The Church is headquartered in Salt Lake City, Utah, and has approximately 14 million members around the world.

    The president of BYU–Hawaii is President Steven C. Wheelwright, who is internationally known for his ability to solve complex managerial problems and foresee future business trends. He became the president of BYU–Hawaii in June 2007. 

    There are about 2,700 students during fall and winter semesters.

    Although separately incorporated, BYU–Hawaii is part of the three-campus BYU system that includes BYU-Idaho, located in Rexburg, and BYU in Provo, Utah.

    BYU–Hawaii is closely linked with the Polynesian Cultural Center (PCC), the number one paid tourist attraction in Hawaii, where over 30-percent of BYU–Hawaii students work as performers, guides, food service personnel, and in a variety of other positions. Hundreds of students have the opportunity to pay for their education because of their employment at the PCC. 

    Visit the University Communications website for press resources

    The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints has 20 wards (congregations) organized into three stakes (dioceses) on the BYU–Hawaii campus. About 100-150 students attend religious services in each ward. The experience that students gain in these wards as they carry out church responsibilities provides the LDS Church with a rich source of leadership when students graduate and participate in wards in their homelands around the world. Students who are members of other faiths are welcome to participate in LDS services or to attend other services in the area. 

    BYU–Hawaii students excel in athletics competition as well as in the classroom. In the NAIA and more recently in NCAA Division II, our teams have compiled 24 total national titles in men's and women's volleyball, men's and women's tennis, and rugby. The Seasiders have also claimed nine individual national titles in men's and women's tennis and women's cross country.

    Intercollegiate sports include the following: NCAA Division II, Pacific-Western conference: men's and women's basketball, men's and women's cross-country, men's golf, men's and women's soccer, women's softball, men's and women's tennis, and women's volleyball.

    Intramural sports include the following: badminton, basketball, bowling, cross-country, football, golf, racquetball, swimming, table tennis, tennis, track and field and volleyball.

    Visit the Athletics website for more information.

    Campus facilities include the following: the 4500-seat Cannon Activities Center, natural history museum, Olympic-size swimming pool, English language institute, artifact collection housed in library, Institute for Polynesian Studies, TV studio, and fitness center. Also included on campus are on-campus housing in six dormitories for single students; about 300 apartments for married students; interest-based clubs and over 20 student chapters representing the Pacific Islands and Asia; performing arts and intramural athletic programs; health, counseling and student employment services; and services for the learning disabled, including visual, hearing and speech impaired students.

    When applying to BYU–Hawaii, each student agrees to abide by the school's honor code, which is based on standards established by the The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints who owns the university. 

    Visit the Honor Code website for more information. 

    BYU–Hawaii is consistently ranked 2nd for Baccalaureate institutions with the most international students in the Open Doors Report on International Educational Exchange by the Institute of International Education.

    Several of our unique majors including Hawaiian Studies, Pacific Island Studies, International Cultural Studies, TESOL, Hospitality and Tourism Management are among the best of their kind in the US.

    Many of our athletic teams are also consistently nationally ranked.

    Because the computer login requires a CES Net ID and password, only current students and employees of BYU–Hawaii are able to log in to the computers.

     

    Academic Computing Labs offer students computing resources all over campus.  

    Students will have access to Microsoft applications, Internet Explorer, and other necessary software. Click on the following links to learn more about Academic Computing Labs. 

    Lab Locations
    Seat Availability
    Lab Schedules (all labs are closed for Devotionals)

    BYU–Hawaii also has kiosks, or walk-up workstations, that provide email and web browsing. Kiosk locations include the following:

    Aloha Center (near the front desk)
    Administration building (next to Human Resources)
    Library (through the main doors and immediately on the left)

     

    Wireless can be found in all the buildings on campus, with the exception of the Stake Center. Click here to see the list of wireless hot spots.

    BYU–Hawaii currently has a 350 Mbps Internet connection.

    Users must obtain a CES NetID and password which is normally received at the time a user receives their email account. Any questions on IDs or passwords should be directed to (808) 675-3211.

     

    Wireless technology is available in many areas of campus, including the Resnet area (TVA, Hales, and Town Homes). Public ports are available on the second floor of the Library. Patch cords are available at the Aloha Center front desk. Kiosks and labs are also available for web browsing and email around campus for students who don't have laptops. Click here for more information about the wireless service on campus.

    Wireless network access is available throughout residence halls, libraries, academic and administrative buildings, research labs and many classrooms as well. Outdoor coverage is provided in most of the courtyard areas. 

    Click here to learn how to connect your device to the internet. 

    Visit the Financial Aid website to view other important financial aid information. 

    Visit the Financial Aid website for deadlines regarding financial aid. Visit the Academics website for registration deadlines.

    Visit the Financial Aid website for further information.

    • Yes. A majority of our students work on campus or at the Polynesian Cultural Center to help pay for their school and living expenses.
    • Most students work 19 hours/week during the semesters and 40 hours/week during the summer term if they are not in school.  You can earn about $7500 annually working these hours.
    • On-campus jobs include: office jobs, service jobs in Food Services, Facilities Management, Housing, etc.
    • PCC jobs include: tour guides, dancers, village workers, office jobs, service jobs in food services, maintenance, etc.

    Visit the Human Resources website for more information about student employment.

    Housing (4)
    • About 1100 single students live in the dormitories on campus. Freshmen students are required to live in the dormitories.
    • About 300 married students and their families live in married student apartments adjacent to the campus.
    • Transfer students with more than 30 credit hours may live off campus. Off-campus housing in the area is usually more expensive.

    Visit the Housing Department website for more details.

    No, we do not provide phones for the Hale dorms. There are pay phones located throughout campus that can be used if students wish.

    No. Students who need to make long distance calls must have a calling card from one of the service providers, and need to follow the calling instructions printed on the card.

    All international applicants will receive a DS-2019 for a J Visa.

    Non-student spouses of married J1 students will receive a J2 Visa and after paying a $400 application fee (and a three-month wait) to the US Government, may qualify to work on or off campus.

    Please refer tothis letter: Important Information About Your Visa

    Visit the Financial Aid website for further information.

    61 on the IBT TOEFL (500 on the paper test)

    5.5 on IELTS

    75+ on the Michigan

    • Most international students from non-English speaking countries must take the English Placement Test when they arrive on campus. There are three possible outcomes from the test. First, if you have high academic English skills, you will not need to take any EIL (English as an International Language) classes. Second, if you need a little bit more help with academic English, you will be placed into the advanced EIL classes. Everyone in advanced EIL classes must take other university classes in order to fill their schedule. In other words, at the advanced EIL level, students take both EIL and other university classes at the same time. Third, if academic English is somewhat difficult for you, you will be placed into the intermediate EIL classes. At this level, all of the classes are EIL classes until you reach the advanced EIL level. It is important to remember, however, that all EIL classes give you university credit and count towards graduation.

    • Students are required to take 12 credit hours for fall and winter semesters and 6 credit hours for spring and summer terms to be considered full-time. IWORK students must take 14 credits for fall and winter semesters. Student receiving university scholarships must take 14 credits during fall and winter semesters.

    For current information, please check the Dates to Remember page.

    You need 120 semester hours of credit to graduate.

    BYU–Hawaii has a variety of online courses available. Online courses are recommended for students preparing to attend any of the BYU schools, students who were not accepted to BYU–Hawaii who plan to apply again later, students who would like to improve their English skills, and more. Visit the BYU–Hawaii Online page to learn more about the program, including available courses, costs, and registration dates. 

    No. You only need to clear holds/restrictions that pertain to registration.  Please visit my.byuh.edu and log on using your CES Net ID and password. Then click the “Student” tab and click on “Student Center” to check for any holds/restrictions.

    Yes. Other unpaid and overdue financial obligations could also cause classes to be dropped.

    • Most international students from non-English speaking countries must take the English Placement Test when they arrive on campus. There are three possible outcomes from the test. First, if you have high academic English skills, you will not need to take any EIL (English as an International Language) classes. Second, if you need a little bit more help with academic English, you will be placed into the advanced EIL classes. Everyone in advanced EIL classes must take other university classes in order to fill their schedule. In other words, at the advanced EIL level, students take both EIL and other university classes at the same time. Third, if academic English is somewhat difficult for you, you will be placed into the intermediate EIL classes. At this level, all of the classes are EIL classes until you reach the advanced EIL level. It is important to remember, however, that all EIL classes give you university credit and count towards graduation.

    Visit the Religious Education website for religion class requirements. 

    Visit the online catalog to view General Education requirements. 

    • Yes. A majority of our students work on campus or at the Polynesian Cultural Center to help pay for their school and living expenses.
    • Most students work 19 hours/week during the semesters and 40 hours/week during the summer term if they are not in school.  You can earn about $7500 annually working these hours.
    • On-campus jobs include: office jobs, service jobs in Food Services, Facilities Management, Housing, etc.
    • PCC jobs include: tour guides, dancers, village workers, office jobs, service jobs in food services, maintenance, etc.
    • Visit the Human Resources website for more information about student employment.

    About 1100 single students live in the dormitories on campus. Freshmen students are required to live in the dormitories.

    About 300 married students and their families live in married student apartments adjacent to the campus.

    Transfer students with more than 30 credit hours may live off campus. Off-campus housing in the area is usually more expensive.

    Visit the Housing Department website for more details.

    BYU–Hawaii students abide by the Honor Code. This code includes:

    • Dress and grooming standards (modest clothing and hairstyles).
    • No alcohol, drugs, tobacco, coffee or tea.
    • No premarital or extra-marital sexual relations.
    • No cheating or plagiarizing.
    • Students also attend church meetings each Sunday.
    • Religion classes are required for graduation.
    • Devotional meetings for all students are held weekly campus and all campus offices and services are closed during this time.

     

     

     

     

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