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Learning Framework


Since its prophetic inception, the Brigham Young University–Hawai'i community has worked to fulfill its mandate–to produce peace-builders and leaders in a multicultural, Christ-centered environment. With such diversity, located in the historic pu'uhonua (place of refuge) of La'ie, BYU–Hawaii is a unique and sacred place of learning. As such, it is our kuleana (stewardship) as faculty, staff, and students to cultivate a healthy learning environment, one that encourages excellence, promotes respect and appreciation for cultural differences, and inspires a love for God and all people.



Faith, Spirit, Consecrated Service

Learning occurs best when we are motivated by faith, guided by the Holy Spirit, and centered on serving God.

As you increase your faith in God, it becomes a catalyst of action and of power that motivates you to seek inspiration and direction from the Spirit. In D&C 42:14 we are taught: "The Spirit shall be given unto you by the prayer of faith." Faith and the companionship of the Holy Ghost expands your learning capacity. The Spirit helps us better understand one another and together be edified (D&C 50:22). Further, the power of your faith and the influence of the Holy Spirit can be magnified when your primary motives for learning are rooted in our baptismal and temple covenants to love one another, serve God, and to build His kingdom.

Active, Not Passive

Learning occurs best when we are active in the learning process.

Being an active learner means that before class you construct and connect in your mind the ideas and concepts being introduced in your course materials and readings. Then you should go to class prepared to share and teach others what you learned. Through your classroom conversations, collaborating, and interacting with your peers and instructors, you will enhance your ability to appreciate differences and prepare to navigate the complexities of a culturally diverse world. Do not go to class expecting to sit and just listen. Go to be active, to contribute, and to serve.

Self Directed Learning

Learning occurs best when we are self-directed and take responsibility for our learning.

Your experience in class is an important part of your leadership development at BYU–Hawaii. When you cultivate a personal vision of your program of study you are approaching your class as a leader. Be a leader by setting personal goals and standards with assistance from your teachers and advisors. Take personal responsibility for what happens to you, both internally and externally. Take initiative and be the leader of your education by planning and executing ways to improve your learning.

Engaged in meaningful reflection and self assesment

Learning occurs best when we are engaged in meaningful reflection and self-assessment.

It is important to regularly assess and reflect on your learning. Feedback from teachers and fellow students is important, but equally important is your evaluation of yourself. Make time for self-assessment and reflection on what you have learned and how it applies to your life. With insights gathered from your class preparation and discussions with others, make changes as needed to improve your understanding and make the necessary adjustments to your thinking and approach to learning.

Open to Changing how to think, feel, and act

Learning occurs best when we are open to changing how we think, feel, and act.

As you study and learn, you will encounter new knowledge, perspectives, and ideas that can transform the way you think, solve problems, make decisions, and act. What you learn may also change the way you think of yourself, others, and the physical and social world. These changes occur when you are open to new ideas and concepts and are willing to modify some of your assumptions and prior "knowledge." Learning will require you to construct new mental models. Being open to change is essential as you increase your capacity to navigate the complexities of a fast changing world.

Constantly improving the capacity to study and learn effectively

Learning occurs best when we are constantly improving our capacity to study and learn effectively.

No one can learn for us. It is just as important that you consistently improve your capacity to learn as it is to master the material in your courses. Doing so will enhance your ability and enjoyment in learning for a lifetime. Your task is to construct the ideas in your mind and the meaning that the material holds for you. Constantly improve your reading comprehension, skill at note taking, methods of organizing new material, getting the "big picture" associated with new concepts, and use a systematic method for review. Learning how to learn more effectively than you already do is one of the most important things you can do as a student at BYU–Hawaii.

  • Faith, Spirit, Consecrated Service

    Learning occurs best when we are motivated by faith, guided
    by the Holy Spirit, and centered on serving God.

    As you increase your faith in God, it becomes a catalyst of action and of
    power that motivates you to seek inspiration and direction from the Spirit.
    In D&C 42:14 we are taught: "The Spirit shall be given unto you by the
    prayer of faith." Faith and the companionship of the Holy Ghost expands
    your learning capacity. The Spirit helps us better understand one another
    and together be edified (D&C 50:22). Further, the power of your faith and
    the influence of the Holy Spirit can be magnified when your primary
    motives for learning are rooted in our baptismal and temple covenants to
    love one another, serve God, and to build His kingdom.

     1 

  • Active, Not Passive

    Learning occurs best when we are active in the learning process.

    Being an active learner means that before class you construct and connect
    in your mind the ideas and concepts being introduced in your course
    materials and readings. Then you should go to class prepared to share and
    teach others what you learned. Through your classroom conversations,
    collaborating, and interacting with your peers and instructors, you will
    enhance your ability to appreciate differences and prepare to navigate the
    complexities of a culturally diverse world. Do not go to class expecting to sit
    and just listen. Go to be active, to contribute, and to serve.

     2 

  • Self Directed Learning

    Learning occurs best when we are self-directed and take
    responsibility for our learning.

    Your experience in class is an important part of your leadership development
    at BYU–Hawaii. When you cultivate a personal vision of your program of study
    you are approaching your class as a leader. Be a leader by setting personal
    goals and standards with assistance from your teachers and advisors. Take
    personal responsibility for what happens to you, both internally and externally.
    Take initiative and be the leader of your education by planning and executing
    ways to improve your learning.

     3 

  • Engaged in meaningful reflection and self assesment

    Learning occurs best when we are engaged in meaningful reflection
    and self-assessment.

    It is important to regularly assess and reflect on your learning. Feedback
    from teachers and fellow students is important, but equally important is your
    evaluation of yourself. Make time for self-assessment and reflection on what
    you have learned and how it applies to your life. With insights gathered from
    your class preparation and discussions with others, make changes as
    needed to improve your understanding and make the necessary
    adjustments to your thinking and approach to learning.

     4 

  • Open to Changing how to think, feel, and act

    Learning occurs best when we are open to changing how we think,
    feel, and act.

    As you study and learn, you will encounter new knowledge, perspectives, and
    ideas that can transform the way you think, solve problems, make decisions,
    and act. What you learn may also change the way you think of yourself,
    others, and the physical and social world. These changes occur when you are
    open to new ideas and concepts and are willing to modify some of your
    assumptions and prior "knowledge." Learning will require you to construct
    new mental models. Being open to change is essential as you increase your
    capacity to navigate the complexities of a fast changing world.

     5 

  • Constantly improving the capacity to study and learn
    effectively

    Learning occurs best when we are constantly improving our
    capacity to study and learn effectively.

    No one can learn for us. It is just as important that you consistently improve
    your capacity to learn as it is to master the material in your courses. Doing so
    will enhance your ability and enjoyment in learning for a lifetime. Your task is
    to construct the ideas in your mind and the meaning that the material holds
    for you. Constantly improve your reading comprehension, skill at note taking,
    methods of organizing new material, getting the "big picture" associated with
    new concepts, and use a systematic method for review. Learning how to
    learn more effectively than you already do is one of the most important things
    you can do as a student at BYU–Hawaii.

     6 



Prepare

To be successful, preparation is key. Before class, study the course material and develop a solid understanding of it. Try to construct an understanding of the big picture and how each of the ideas and concepts relate to each other. Where appropriate use study groups to improve yours and others understanding of the material.

Engage

When attending class actively participate in discussions and ask questions. Test your ideas out with others and be open to their ideas and insights as well. As you leave class ask yourself, "Was class better because I was there today?"

Improve

Reflect on learning experiences and allow them to shape you into a more complete person; be willing to change your position or perspective on a certain subject. Take new risks and seek further opportunities to learn.